Skip to content

Online Master of Public and Nonprofit Administration Courses

Curriculum Details

The curriculum in Calvin’s MPA online program prepares you to take a Christ-centered, ethical, and efficient approach to leadership and public and nonprofit administration. The program brings together learners from government, for-profit, and nonprofit entities (including faith-based organizations), exploring the interplay among such entities in providing public services.

Calvin’s MPA program includes concentrations that allow you to gain specialized knowledge to advance in your field, including Health Services Administration, Law Enforcement Management and Leadership, Nonprofit Administration and Community Engagement, Program Policy and Analysis, State and Local Government Administration, and Spatial Analysis. We also offer a range of electives that will help you determine the best path to meeting your goals.

For those who are not looking for a master’s program, we also offer three certificate programs.

Public Administration Certificate

Credits

An exploration of the history and organizational expressions of public service and public institutions within government and society, engaging perennial and new debates over the interplay of government and the nonprofit sector, including churches. It addresses organizational issues as federalism, division of power, and public-private partnerships, and values issues such as equity and justice. 

An introduction to the field of public and nonprofit administration, focusing on organizational purposes, operations, and policies; theories of organizational functions, leadership, and management; budgets and funding; accountability and oversight. The course also examines the politics and operations of public agencies and nonprofit organizations and both inter- and intra-organizational interactions.

An examination of the relationship between politics and administration, defining public interest and differing public values. Topics include organizational leadership, budget and financing, human capital and staffing, ethics, strategic planning.

An introduction to the academic literature on community development and impediments that stand in its way, i.e., economic divestment, inadequate housing, structural violence, lack of community services, crime, etc. It considers the various roles that government, the private sector, and non-profit organizations play in community revitalization and offers models of change for community revitalization that include, among others, doughnut economics, social mobilization, and asset-based community development.

An introduction to local politics and government in the United States, examining who is involved in local politics and how the political processes in cities shape policies. Topics include urban political institutions, machine politics, federal urban policy, race representation in cities, local elections, structure of local administrations and key policy areas within the local and metropolitan context, such as education, policing, and urban planning and development. The course will also examine the historical practices of cities with the United States.

Nonprofit Administration Certificate

Credits

An exploration of the history and organizational expressions of public service and public institutions within government and society, engaging perennial and new debates over the interplay of government and the nonprofit sector, including churches. It addresses organizational issues as federalism, division of power, and public-private partnerships, and values issues such as equity and justice. 

An introduction to the field of public and nonprofit administration, focusing on organizational purposes, operations, and policies; theories of organizational functions, leadership, and management; budgets and funding; accountability and oversight. The course also examines the politics and operations of public agencies and nonprofit organizations and both inter- and intra-organizational interactions.

An introduction to the academic literature on community development and impediments that stand in its way, i.e., economic divestment, inadequate housing, structural violence, lack of community services, crime, etc. It considers the various roles that government, the private sector, and non-profit organizations play in community revitalization and offers models of change for community revitalization that include, among others, doughnut economics, social mobilization, and asset-based community development.

Why are some nonprofit organizations more efficient and stewardly than others? This course establishes a foundation in financial management for those with minimal or no experience in accounting.  Areas of emphasis include knowledge and skills needed for distributing and managing resources, and for performing and using analyses and reports to effectively steward the financial health of the organization. Topics include key accounting principles, an overview of financial statements and how they are used in the budget development process and cash flow analysis, understanding the audit report, maximizing investment policy, and the responsibilities regarding government compliance. All of these will be looked at through the lens of ethical standards.

NOPM 607 – Nonprofit Boards and Community Leadership
Nonprofit board of directors are integral to the process of governing and achieving effective community collaborations and public/private partnerships. This course incorporates and applies organizational behavior and theory to explore the leadership role, responsibilities, and interaction between board members and the executive director. Areas of examination include a comparison of different governing models, key questions to consider in board selection and composition, the responsibilities of advisory boards, working with committees, and the expectations of the board in the area of fundraising.

OR

NOPM 609 – Designing an Effective Nonprofit Organization
Nonprofit organizations, whether newly developed or established, need to incorporate methods and processes to be sustainable, This course focuses on how to design a nonprofit organization capable of raising the human and financial resources to sustain the organization as well as emerging methods for effective programming and specific nonprofit evaluation methods. Learn the various aspects of resource development including fund-raising strategies, processes, trends and ethics, public and private grant writing, submission, measurement and evaluation. The course emphasizes the examination of current trends in earned-income strategies, social entrepreneurship, and maximizing available ‘corporate social responsibility’ resources. Underscoring the importance of volunteers in achieving nonprofit goals, the course also focuses on approaches to volunteer development, volunteer recruitment, training, retention/theories of motivation, and leadership and certain ethical issues associated with volunteers.

Program and policy Analysis Certificate

Credits

An exploration of the history and organizational expressions of public service and public institutions within government and society, engaging perennial and new debates over the interplay of government and the nonprofit sector, including churches. It addresses organizational issues as federalism, division of power, and public-private partnerships, and values issues such as equity and justice. 

An introduction to the field of public and nonprofit administration, focusing on organizational purposes, operations, and policies; theories of organizational functions, leadership, and management; budgets and funding; accountability and oversight. The course also examines the politics and operations of public agencies and nonprofit organizations and both inter- and intra-organizational interactions.

An introduction to concepts, methods, and tools of program evaluation, with emphasis on evaluating the quality of available information, designing evaluation, analyzing data, and interpreting and reporting results. Prerequisite: MGMT 535 or equivalent. (first offering in Fall 2024)

Collecting, managing and processing large data sets is critical to business analytics and data science. This course focuses on the core skills and concepts needed to pull data from a range of sources both inside and outside of organizations; to filter, transform, and combine data sets to prepare them for data cleaning and analysis; and construct quantitative summaries and basic visualizations.

An introduction to the principles and practices of effective data visualization as an essential skill for learning from data and for communicating with others, both within and outside of an organization. Students will combine principles from statistics, psychology and computer science to design and create visualizations and use them to communicate with and about data to stakeholders and others.

MPA Core Courses

Credits

An exploration of the history and organizational expressions of public service and public institutions within government and society, engaging perennial and new debates over the interplay of government and the nonprofit sector, including churches. It addresses organizational issues as federalism, division of power, and public-private partnerships, and values issues such as equity and justice. 

An introduction to the field of public and nonprofit administration, focusing on organizational purposes, operations, and policies; theories of organizational functions, leadership, and management; budgets and funding; accountability and oversight. The course also examines the politics and operations of public agencies and nonprofit organizations and both inter- and intra-organizational interactions.

An examination of the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping human behavior through critical engagement with management perspectives of both scholars and practitioners. Topics group dynamics, interpersonal skills, organizational leadership, and value systems.

Why are some nonprofit organizations more efficient and stewardly than others? This course establishes a foundation in financial management for those with minimal or no experience in accounting.  Areas of emphasis include knowledge and skills needed for distributing and managing resources, and for performing and using analyses and reports to effectively steward the financial health of the organization. Topics include key accounting principles, an overview of financial statements and how they are used in the budget development process and cash flow analysis, understanding the audit report, maximizing investment policy, and the responsibilities regarding government compliance. All of these will be looked at through the lens of ethical standards.

Students will learn about their legal rights, legal obligations, and ethical responsibilities as communicators. They also will investigate the principles on which those rights, obligations, and responsibilities are based—including social and cultural values, Christian virtues, and professional standards. In addition, they will learn to exercise legal and moral reasoning when confronted with challenging situations in their vocation. Finally, they will learn about the temptations and consequences of violating legal and ethical directives—and will commit to communicating in a legal and ethical way.

Students will learn about their legal responsibilities as professional communicators. They will investigate the principles on which those obligations and responsibilities are based, including professional standards. In addition, they will learn to exercise moral and ethical reasoning when confronted with challenging situations in their vocation.

Organizational leaders are expected to make effective data-driven decisions. This course focuses on the development and use of accounting information in the analysis and decision-making process. This course includes financial accounting and managerial accounting topics. The financial accounting topics include Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), asset valuation, measurement of liabilities, and income determination. The managerial accounting topics include cost-volume-profit analysis, differential analysis, and budgeting. In addition to using accounting information to make effective decisions, the course focuses on communicating (orally, visually, and in writing) to a variety of stakeholders.

Health Services Administration Concentration

Credits

An examination of ethical and legal issues affecting health administration, including licensing and regulation, contracts, insurance, fraud and abuse, confidentiality, professional ethics, health care access, and patient care decision-making and consent. (first offering in Fall 2024)

An introduction to philosophical approaches to ethical decision-making in various organizational contexts, informed by Reformed distinctives and drawing on classical and contemporary sources to equip students to lead with integrity, prudence, and wisdom. First offering in Fall 2024.

Public health is a multidisciplinary and vast field that seeks to protect, improve, and promote health and well-being among individuals, communities, and populations. Foundations of public health provides an opportunity to explore the profession—including its history, values and ethics, core functions, practice areas and services. This course will prepare you for subsequent courses in the public health curriculum, providing you with a foundational understanding of how public health interacts with population health.

The world continues to become more interconnected providing opportunities for both the spread of disease but also collective problem solving. This course sets the foundation for understanding how globalization affects population health across the world, introduces how we quantify the global burden of disease, identifies the global actors responsible for setting health policies and their roles, and provides a context for health and human rights. Students will identify key global health issues and needs such as infant and maternal health, infectious diseases, and nutrition as well as determinants of health in these areas.

Law Enforcement Management and Leadership

Credits

An introduction to police management that combines academic principles with practical functions and focuses on a range of critical leadership and management areas, including planning and policies, media relations, organizational behavior, budgeting and resource allocation, human resources, and contemporary policing issues. (first offering in Fall 2024)

An introduction to philosophical approaches to ethical decision-making in various organizational contexts, informed by Reformed distinctives and drawing on classical and contemporary sources to equip students to lead with integrity, prudence, and wisdom. First offering in Fall 2024.

An examination of the relationship between politics and administration, defining public interest and differing public values. Topics include organizational leadership, budget and financing, human capital and staffing, ethics, strategic planning.

This course prepares students to provide formal and informal leadership to groups, teams, and organizations. Students learn to design and implement effective team processes and diagnose team performance and the threats and opportunities teams face. Students gain an understanding of the relevant frameworks for organizational design, culture, and change and will practice applying these frameworks using assignments and case studies.

Nonprofit Administration and Community Engagement Concentration

Credits

This course prepares students to provide formal and informal leadership to groups, teams, and organizations. Students learn to design and implement effective team processes and diagnose team performance and the threats and opportunities teams face. Students gain an understanding of the relevant frameworks for organizational design, culture, and change and will practice applying these frameworks using assignments and case studies.

NOPM 607 – Nonprofit Boards and Community Leadership
Nonprofit board of directors are integral to the process of governing and achieving effective community collaborations and public/private partnerships. This course incorporates and applies organizational behavior and theory to explore the leadership role, responsibilities, and interaction between board members and the executive director. Areas of examination include a comparison of different governing models, key questions to consider in board selection and composition, the responsibilities of advisory boards, working with committees, and the expectations of the board in the area of fundraising.

OR

NOPM 609 – Designing an Effective Nonprofit Organization
Nonprofit organizations, whether newly developed or established, need to incorporate methods and processes to be sustainable, This course focuses on how to design a nonprofit organization capable of raising the human and financial resources to sustain the organization as well as emerging methods for effective programming and specific nonprofit evaluation methods. Learn the various aspects of resource development including fund-raising strategies, processes, trends and ethics, public and private grant writing, submission, measurement and evaluation. The course emphasizes the examination of current trends in earned-income strategies, social entrepreneurship, and maximizing available ‘corporate social responsibility’ resources. Underscoring the importance of volunteers in achieving nonprofit goals, the course also focuses on approaches to volunteer development, volunteer recruitment, training, retention/theories of motivation, and leadership and certain ethical issues associated with volunteers.

An introduction to philosophical approaches to ethical decision-making in various organizational contexts, informed by Reformed distinctives and drawing on classical and contemporary sources to equip students to lead with integrity, prudence, and wisdom. First offering in Fall 2024.

An introduction to the academic literature on community development and impediments that stand in its way, i.e., economic divestment, inadequate housing, structural violence, lack of community services, crime, etc. It considers the various roles that government, the private sector, and non-profit organizations play in community revitalization and offers models of change for community revitalization that include, among others, doughnut economics, social mobilization, and asset-based community development.

Program Policy and Analysis Concentration

Credits

An introduction to concepts, methods, and tools of program evaluation, with emphasis on evaluating the quality of available information, designing evaluation, analyzing data, and interpreting and reporting results. Prerequisite: MGMT 535 or equivalent. (first offering in Fall 2024)

Collecting, managing and processing large data sets is critical to business analytics and data science. This course focuses on the core skills and concepts needed to pull data from a range of sources both inside and outside of organizations; to filter, transform, and combine data sets to prepare them for data cleaning and analysis; and construct quantitative summaries and basic visualizations.

Businesses leverage increasingly large collections of data about people, products, and processes. Predictive analytics provides tools to discover patterns and anticipate trends in such data. This course introduces the foundational principles of predictive analytics and provides a survey of a wide range of predictive methods, both battle-tested classics and emerging high-capacity deep learning models.

An introduction to the principles and practices of effective data visualization as an essential skill for learning from data and for communicating with others, both within and outside of an organization. Students will combine principles from statistics, psychology and computer science to design and create visualizations and use them to communicate with and about data to stakeholders and others.

Spatial Analysis Concentration

Credits

This course focuses on geographic information systems (GIS) and the art and science of mapping for spatial analysis. Map-design techniques and visual communication using GIS vector and raster data forms will be explored, as well as a variety of methods for analyzing spatial relationships. Topics include those of the physical world and landscape, social justice, poverty, and a significant end-of-semester project. This course has a lecture and lab component, and lab work will give practical experience to students using the ArcGIS suite. Students will complete a GIS project tailored to their disciplinary interest and also explore religious faith in professional GIS life.

This course introduces advanced themes in Geographic Information Systems including spatial database design, spatial algorithms, implementation and design, and advanced GIS applications including designs for community development and service tailored to individual students’ industrial application.

This course provides an introduction to demography and geographical analysis. Specific attention is given to the study of social, economic, and health statistics as they change over time and space, which illustrate the changing structure of human populations. Readings in demographic research and a GIS-based semester project will comprise the second half of the course.

State and Local Government Administration Concentration

Credits

An examination of the relationship between politics and administration, defining public interest and differing public values. Topics include organizational leadership, budget and financing, human capital and staffing, ethics, strategic planning.

An introduction to the academic literature on community development and impediments that stand in its way, i.e., economic divestment, inadequate housing, structural violence, lack of community services, crime, etc. It considers the various roles that government, the private sector, and non-profit organizations play in community revitalization and offers models of change for community revitalization that include, among others, doughnut economics, social mobilization, and asset-based community development.

An introduction to local politics and government in the United States, examining who is involved in local politics and how the political processes in cities shape policies. Topics include urban political institutions, machine politics, federal urban policy, race representation in cities, local elections, structure of local administrations and key policy areas within the local and metropolitan context, such as education, policing, and urban planning and development. The course will also examine the historical practices of cities with the United States.

Elective Courses (6 semester hours)

Credits

An examination of ethical and legal issues affecting health administration, including licensing and regulation, contracts, insurance, fraud and abuse, confidentiality, professional ethics, health care access, and patient care decision-making and consent. (first offering in Fall 2024)

An introduction to police management that combines academic principles with practical functions and focuses on a range of critical leadership and management areas, including planning and policies, media relations, organizational behavior, budgeting and resource allocation, human resources, and contemporary policing issues. (first offering in Fall 2024)

An introduction to philosophical approaches to ethical decision-making in various organizational contexts, informed by Reformed distinctives and drawing on classical and contemporary sources to equip students to lead with integrity, prudence, and wisdom. First offering in Fall 2024.

An examination of the relationship between politics and administration, defining public interest and differing public values. Topics include organizational leadership, budget and financing, human capital and staffing, ethics, strategic planning.

An introduction to the academic literature on community development and impediments that stand in its way, i.e., economic divestment, inadequate housing, structural violence, lack of community services, crime, etc. It considers the various roles that government, the private sector, and non-profit organizations play in community revitalization and offers models of change for community revitalization that include, among others, doughnut economics, social mobilization, and asset-based community development.

An introduction to local politics and government in the United States, examining who is involved in local politics and how the political processes in cities shape policies. Topics include urban political institutions, machine politics, federal urban policy, race representation in cities, local elections, structure of local administrations and key policy areas within the local and metropolitan context, such as education, policing, and urban planning and development. The course will also examine the historical practices of cities with the United States.

An introduction to concepts, methods, and tools of program evaluation, with emphasis on evaluating the quality of available information, designing evaluation, analyzing data, and interpreting and reporting results. Prerequisite: MGMT 535 or equivalent. (first offering in Fall 2024)

This course introduces students to the strategic planning process, communication strategies, and message creation involved in public relations. Students will learn how to develop, implement and evaluate public relations campaigns by examining case studies and creating an actual campaign. This course also focuses on the use of social media and other new media channels, examining how they can be employed to better serve the organization’s communication and relationship-building needs. Students must also enroll in COMM 520 Media Lab to create the class multimedia project.

A study of the role of diverse forms of media in society and an examination of critical and cultural perspectives on media. The course examines the media as a source of influential narratives, and offers an understanding of the relationship of media to democracy, capitalism, technology, audiences, media institutions, and economics. This course is also offered as COMM 330.

This course focuses on geographic information systems (GIS) and the art and science of mapping for spatial analysis. Map-design techniques and visual communication using GIS vector and raster data forms will be explored, as well as a variety of methods for analyzing spatial relationships. Topics include those of the physical world and landscape, social justice, poverty, and a significant end-of-semester project. This course has a lecture and lab component, and lab work will give practical experience to students using the ArcGIS suite. Students will complete a GIS project tailored to their disciplinary interest and also explore religious faith in professional GIS life.

This course introduces advanced themes in Geographic Information Systems including spatial database design, spatial algorithms, implementation and design, and advanced GIS applications including designs for community development and service tailored to individual students’ industrial application.

This course provides an introduction to demography and geographical analysis. Specific attention is given to the study of social, economic, and health statistics as they change over time and space, which illustrate the changing structure of human populations. Readings in demographic research and a GIS-based semester project will comprise the second half of the course.

This course explores the exciting world of business spatial analytics and location-based services. Topics include gravity modeling, suitability analysis for potential market location, social and economic population analysis, and business and facilities saturation. Students will complete a GIS-based project for a local Non-profit business during the semester as a Service-Learning project.

Collecting, managing and processing large data sets is critical to business analytics and data science. This course focuses on the core skills and concepts needed to pull data from a range of sources both inside and outside of organizations; to filter, transform, and combine data sets to prepare them for data cleaning and analysis; and construct quantitative summaries and basic visualizations.

Businesses leverage increasingly large collections of data about people, products, and processes. Predictive analytics provides tools to discover patterns and anticipate trends in such data. This course introduces the foundational principles of predictive analytics and provides a survey of a wide range of predictive methods, both battle-tested classics and emerging high-capacity deep learning models.

An introduction to the principles and practices of effective data visualization as an essential skill for learning from data and for communicating with others, both within and outside of an organization. Students will combine principles from statistics, psychology and computer science to design and create visualizations and use them to communicate with and about data to stakeholders and others.

This course prepares students to provide formal and informal leadership to groups, teams, and organizations. Students learn to design and implement effective team processes and diagnose team performance and the threats and opportunities teams face. Students gain an understanding of the relevant frameworks for organizational design, culture, and change and will practice applying these frameworks using assignments and case studies.

This course is a foundational learning environment for students to acquire business innovation and strategy frameworks and tools. An important part of the learning comes from applying with teammates the frameworks and tools to an actual situation of a for-profit company or nonprofit organization who participates in the courses as a course sponsor.

Nonprofit board of directors are integral to the process of governing and achieving effective community collaborations and public/private partnerships. This course incorporates and applies organizational behavior and theory to explore the leadership role, responsibilities, and interaction between board members and the executive director. Areas of examination include a comparison of different governing models, key questions to consider in board selection and composition, the responsibilities of advisory boards, working with committees, and the expectations of the board in the area of fundraising.

Nonprofit organizations, whether newly developed or established, need to incorporate methods and processes to be sustainable, This course focuses on how to design a nonprofit organization capable of raising the human and financial resources to sustain the organization as well as emerging methods for effective programming and specific nonprofit evaluation methods. Learn the various aspects of resource development including fund-raising strategies, processes, trends and ethics, public and private grant writing, submission, measurement and evaluation. The course emphasizes the examination of current trends in earned-income strategies, social entrepreneurship, and maximizing available ‘corporate social responsibility’ resources. Underscoring the importance of volunteers in achieving nonprofit goals, the course also focuses on approaches to volunteer development, volunteer recruitment, training, retention/theories of motivation, and leadership and certain ethical issues associated with volunteers.

Public health is a multidisciplinary and vast field that seeks to protect, improve, and promote health and well-being among individuals, communities, and populations. Foundations of public health provides an opportunity to explore the profession—including its history, values and ethics, core functions, practice areas and services. This course will prepare you for subsequent courses in the public health curriculum, providing you with a foundational understanding of how public health interacts with population health.

Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in different human populations and the application of methods to improve disease outcomes. This course will introduce you to studies of the history and basic principles of epidemiology including measures of disease frequency, epidemiologic study design, bias, confounding, screening, and causality. You will also examine common ethical issues in epidemiologic research and practice.

Understanding and interpreting data is a necessary skill for understanding health metrics and making good public health decisions. You will learn statistical methods and principles necessary for understanding, calculating, and interpreting data used in public health and policy evaluation and formation. Topics include descriptive statistics, graphical data summary, sampling, probability and distributions, statistical comparison of groups, correlation, and regression.

Our environment influences our health and well-being in profound ways. In this course you will explore the basic principles, practices, and major issues in environmental health. We will also examine justice issues related to our environment and explore the environmental justice movement. You will investigate strategies for applying and evaluating environmental health and justice principles and strategies to address looming environmental health challenges such as global climate change, managing hazardous waste, etc.

We live in an era when advances in medical technology and treatment rush at us so fast and furiously that it is easy to lose sight of the critical role of our own behavior in our health and longevity. Health behaviors, attitudes, and overall well-being are also influenced by our gender, age, personality, ethnic and cultural background. This course will promote your understanding of, and respect for, the differences among groups of people; it will increase your awareness of the special challenges and problems faced by various groups. Some of the challenges are, of course, beyond our control, but many are not. We will use research evidence to structure our understanding of social and behavioral aspects of health. We will evaluate appropriate outcomes of behavioral modifications related to health and well-being.

Religion has long been known to influence our behavior and spiritual health. Only in the past two decades have we researched and learned that religious participation can impact individual health. The next logical step would be, if religion and spirituality can affect individual health, then it could also affect public health. This course will examine psychological concepts of human behavior, apply these concepts, and thereby understand human behavior in the context of religion, health and public health. We will use the framework of the Biblical nature of humans as our guide through this course. In this course we will ask questions like: Under what conditions does religion promote health, what conditions under which religion can harm well-being, what psychological concepts contribute to spiritual and physical health, how does the biopsychosocial-spiritual aspect of individual health influence public health?

The world continues to become more interconnected providing opportunities for both the spread of disease but also collective problem solving. This course sets the foundation for understanding how globalization affects population health across the world, introduces how we quantify the global burden of disease, identifies the global actors responsible for setting health policies and their roles, and provides a context for health and human rights. Students will identify key global health issues and needs such as infant and maternal health, infectious diseases, and nutrition as well as determinants of health in these areas.

The development and evaluation of culturally appropriate public health interventions is critical in global public health efforts. Using case studies and examples from across the world, students will be introduced to ways in which interventions succeeded and failed due to the level of engagement with and understanding of local populations. Community-based strategies and frameworks will be discussed and assessed. There will be particular emphasis on how thoughtful public health interventions and evaluations can promote health equity and reduce the global burden of disease. Students will identify challenges to implementing and evaluating programs and policies, and will seek solutions to these challenges.

Political decision-making and leadership heavily influence population health. Students will identify the links between global health governance, policy, and system reform to global health inequalities. Students will evaluate the roles of key global actors and stakeholders in effecting health outcomes. We will identify best practices in implementing health policy management in effective, ethical, and culturally-appropriate ways. Students will gain preliminary experience in several public health administrative skills such as budgeting, grant writing, and effective leadership. Case studies and examples will be utilized to demonstrate how policy and administrative decisions are made and how they influence population health.

Health and the right to health are intertwined with many other rights, freedoms, and entitlements including food, housing, and employment. Students will explore these connections with a focus on vulnerable populations and intersectionality. Students will engage with and analyze core ethical principles, significant documents, and the efforts of key stakeholders as they relate to health and human rights. The course will introduce human-rights based approaches as means to addressing these inequities that disproportionately affect marginalized populations.

Public health is a professional degree and thus, practical experience is paramount to the MPH program. This course allows you to apply public health skills and knowledge to an agency or field setting. The internship is paired with a professional seminar to provide intentional opportunities for you to connect course content with their practice in the field. You are required to complete at least 130 hours in the field setting along with a weekly course. Prerequisites: All foundational public health courses must be complete prior to enrolling in the practicum course and be in good standing within the public health program.

Request More Information

Thank you for your interest in Calvin University. We are here to answer all of your questions. Submit this form and an admissions counselor will get in touch with you as soon as possible.